Wow! Wearable Art

Every time I am asked to speak on the topic of wearable art or art to wear, I reflect on the relationship between art and clothing.

One of my new favorites.

My background as a custom dressmaker leads me to prefer the phrase artful wearables.  Clothing needs to be functional and well-fitting first.  Then if it’s fabric, design or embellishment add an artful element that falls within the comfort zone of the wearer, the wearable art is a win-win.

A church in Agen France inspired this ensemble which is artful but not very comfortable.

In the 1980’s a client brought me a piece of “wearable art” to alter.  She was an abstract artist and on a trip to NYC had purchased the taffeta art dress in the “village”.  It was silvery grey and black, thick and stiff with painted abstract shapes, and voluminous in size.  But, she loved it.  She put it on in front of the mirror and said, “it needs to be shortened”.  The hem was quite uneven because of the shape and size of the ill- fitting dress and it did not look like a dress that needed an even hem.  So I asked if she wanted it shorter or straightened.  We agreed that I would take an even 2 inches off the dress so it would retain its artistic look.

I wish I had taken a picture of that dress, but taking photos was not as easy then as it is now.  It was an interesting piece of art but it was not a flattering garment.

Though I hesitate to call myself an artist, I think almost every garment I make is an artful expression.

A ginger jar full of roses!

A wedding gown with beautiful fabric and simple lines is as artful on one girl as a painted, lacy creation is on another girl.  A well-cut coat with architectural lines is as artful when worn by a woman with classic tastes as a collage coat is on a whimsical, free spirited dresser.

In my Wow! Wearable Art class at the 2017 Original Sewing & Quilt Expos, we look at examples of garments that are minimalist, embellished, layered, collaged, quilted, and thematic.  We also look at the benefits of repetition within each art form and each design.   This repetition can lead to greater freedom and more creative expression in your work.

Vintage Tie Vest - back

Vintage Tie Vest -Very artful for my mother-in-law.

I love making wearable art and usually I use my Tabula Rasa Jacket pattern as the base for my creations.   I also know that my definition of artful is not everyone’s definition of artful.  My pieces can be subtle; you might have to look closely or on the inside to appreciate their full artful impact.

A peak at the lining of the Symphonic Tale coat.

Finding that comfortable but creative space was hit or miss when I consciously started making artful wearables in the 1990’s.  But remembering the hits and learning from the misses means my work just gets better and better.

The Prayer Flags jacket.

What is your definition of wearable art?  Have you crafted any beautiful or fanciful art garments that are as comfortable to wear as they are interesting to look at?

The very artful Laura Murray looking comfy in her latest Tabula Rasa, she likes a loose look!

If you are ready to start sewing some wearable art, plan to visit an OSQE and participate in the Wow! Wearable Art discussion.  This weekend we will be having the chat in Cleveland but we will also be in Raleigh, NC, Schaumberg IL, and Fredericksburg, VA later this year.  Hope to see you there.

Happy Sewing, RAE

 

 

3 Responses to “Wow! Wearable Art”

  1. cheryl hardy March 29, 2017 at 9:17 am #

    What does the back of the blue “new favorite” jacket look like?

    • Rae Cumbie March 29, 2017 at 9:34 am #

      Click the link to see the back of the jacket. We will get it up in the gallery soon.

  2. Ginger May 23, 2017 at 12:04 am #

    It is interesting how people’s perception of art versus craft or sewing can change. He is open to attending events that he knows I’m interested in (we’ve been to a fashion show of local wearable art and have browsed other quilt displays). However, I know it’s not high on his list of entertaining things to do. He loves art and even though the media isn’t familiar to him, he always spots some specific things that he can appreciate and reflect on even though it’s made in fabric.

    We attended a quilt show here in NJ this past weekend and he was actually very thoughtful and interested in voting for the viewers’ choice award.

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